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6 things about Minnesota’s Collateral Consequences Law You Should Really Know

When making a big decision, obviously the more you know, the better. That’s especially true about a plea agreement for conduct within the reach of the state’s criminal code. Well, there are more things to consider than the statutory penalty for the criminal act — things that might affect your life for years to come. Read on for six things you should know about collateral consequences under Minn. Stat. 245C Subd. 14 & 15. Rehabilitation in Minnesota is Decades Old. In 1974, the Minnesota legislature announced the state’s policy to “encourage and contribute to rehabilitation” pathways that help criminal offenders return to roles as responsible citizens. The state introduced a series of laws that had two goals: First, rehabilitate criminal ex-offenders and the second, to protect the state’s citizens by keeping ex-offenders away from certain jobs where they were likely to hurt vulnerable people or destroy property. Forty-three years later, citizens continue to deal with the difficulty inherent in rehabilitation as a goal. What are collateral consequences? Remember, the Minnesota legislature passed laws whose secondary goal was to protect its citizenry from ex-offenders who might harm them. Current law requires that the Department of Human Services (DHS) carry-out criminal background checks on persons who apply for employment where they will have “direct contact or access” to persons receiving services in DHS facilities. DHS uses the criminal background check information to disqualify applicants on the basis of prior criminal offenses. For example, Section 245C, subsection 14, prohibits direct contact by ex-offenders who have committed felonies, gross misdemeanors, or misdemeanors. This is true whether the incarceration was through conviction, admission, or an Alford plea (that’s a guilty plea with a protest of innocence often used to plea to a lesser charge when the prosecution has enough evidence to convict on the original greater charge). The disqualification also can result from an investigation that results in an administrative finding of an offense under Section 245C.15. DHS in certain circumstances can set aside the disqualification or the license holder can issue a variance. What types of crimes are we talking about as disqualifying crimes? We are talking about permanent disqualification for persons who violate laws under Section 245C.15, such as the predatory offender registration laws, murder (first, second, and third degree), manslaughter (first and second degree), assault, domestic assault, spousal or child abuse/neglect, drug distribution that causes great bodily harm, aggravated robbery, kidnapping, murder of unborn child (first, second, and third degree). There are more but this list is illustrative. 15-year disqualification for lesser felonies. The law provides a 15-year disqualification period for crimes of a lesser nature, if the offense occurred less than 15 years ago and the offense was a felony, such as wrongfully obtaining assistance, false representation, food stamp fraud, arson (second or third degree), possessing burglary tools, insurance fraud, indecent exposure, and others. The law also imposes 10-year disqualification for gross misdemeanors where the sentence discharged less than 10 years ago and 7-year disqualification for misdemeanors where the sentence discharged less than 7 years ago. Is there an appeal… Read more {+}

Steps to Take after Being Released for Minnesota DWI

You went out for the night and got caught drinking and driving. You have been arrested and released with a driving while intoxicated. So, now what should you do? Here are the first steps that you need to take after being released for a DWI. First you need to hire a lawyer. You want a lawyer who is specialized in DWI cases to help you through this whole process. It is important that you don’t miss a single step or you will be more likely to serve time. A great lawyer is worth it because they are skilled at what they do and will ensure that you have a favorable outcome (or as best as you can expect)! Then, you need a chemical dependency evaluation. A chemical dependency evaluation, required by the court system, is used to determine whether or not you have a dependency on drugs or alcohol. The agency who runs the test will talk to you about your past use of drugs and alcohol, if you have ever been treated for dependency on drugs and alcohol, and if you have ever had any trouble with the law. The information from your arrest will also go into consideration. You may need to submit an urine sample. You must follow the recommendations from your chemical dependency evaluation. When your assessment is done, you will get a written copy. In it, you will see your results and diagnosis. If there is any sign of abuse or dependence, you may have to go to an Alcohol Drug Information School or a DUI Victim Impact Panel. Just make sure that you do whatever is required of you as soon as you can. You will have to attend a Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) Impact Panel. The goal at the panel is to prevent repeat DWI offenders. They do this by holding conferences where you can learn how many people are affected by drunk drivers. You are going to hear from family members who have lost people that they love because of someone’s bad decisions. You may also hear from people who are seriously injured due to drunk drivers. If you are allowed to drive, you will need an Ignition Interlock. This is a device that prevents your car from starting if you are drinking. You have to breathe into it like a breathalyzer before you get behind the wheel of your car. Once you take the test, your vehicle will start as long as you haven’t had anything to drink. If you have been drinking, you will have to take the test again before your car will start. You must remember that if you have an Ignition Interlock, the results will be stored and given to the court. If you are continuing to drink and try to get behind the wheel, the courts are going to find out. For this reason, you need to get your drinking under control. If your alcohol limit was .16 or more, you are going to have… Read more {+}

Officer Ray Tensing is the Latest Officer to Walk Free

A mere two weeks after the Yanez Verdict, former University of Cincinnati Officer Ray Tensing becomes the latest Officer to walk free after a second mistrial on murder charges for killing Samuel DuBose, an unarmed black man.  Like so many cases garnering recent attention, this matter was also captured on video.  Here is the primary video footage of the incident (WARNING:  Graphic Content).   The language of the County Attorney in this case was much stronger than just about any we have seen in these cases, calling is “senseless and asinine” and describing it as un-American and something that happens in Afghanistan, not here.  It remains to be seen whether the County Attorney will try the matter for yet a third time, though it is worth noting that, halfway through the trial, the County Attorney sought to add charges of “reckless homicide.”  That motion was denied by the court as untimely. Officer Ray Tensing is the Latest Officer to Walk Free was last modified: June 24th, 2017 by Alex DeMarco

St. Louis Police Officer Shoots Fellow Off Duty Officer. Guess What Color The Victim Was…

If there is one thing that should be unanimously agreed upon, it’s that the phenomenon of “driving while black” is very real.   If you disagree, it’s not your opinion.  You’re up against decades of studies, just a few which can be found by clicking here,  and here.   You’re also far more likely to have your vehicle searched if you’re a person of color. If there is another thing that is becoming apparent, it’s that being lawfully armed while black is even more dangerous.   As if the Yanez case was not a sobering enough example, apparently, even being a police officer an black while get you shot. That’s right.  An off duty cop, an African American, intervened to assist other officers after a car chase ended.  He was then ordered to drop his weapon to go to the ground.  After officers recognized him, he was allowed back up.  That’s when another officer apparently not up to speed on the circumstance emerged from his squad, “feared for his life” and immediately shot his fellow police officer.  With all the talk of gun safety and gun control, it may finally be time to start having a discussion on whether arming every single officer is a good idea.       St. Louis Police Officer Shoots Fellow Off Duty Officer. Guess What Color The Victim Was… was last modified: June 23rd, 2017 by Alex DeMarco

Agent Joe Joswiak Assaults Driver Anthony Promvongsa

Recently released is the the dashcam video from the Worthington Police Department of Agent Joe Joswiak of the Buffalo Ridge Drug Task Force and his assault on Anthony Promvongsa, a driver.   An off duty police officer had called in  to his buddies regarding Mr. Promvongsa’s “erratic driving.”  While this may have warranted an investigatory stop and a simple interrogation or citation, apparently road rage is not simply a problem for civilians.   The assisting, relatively calm officer is Timothy Gaul, a Sargent with the Worthington Police Department.  Sargent Gaul himself as been previously accused of excessive force.   That matter was eventually settled in exchange for dropping all claims.   Sargent Gaul oversees Use of Force operations for the department.   Mr. Promvongsa was actually charged with assault on an officer and resisting arrest.  Whatever can be said of the recent Yanez verdict, at least Yanez was charged and tried for the crime.   He is also no longer a police officer.  It’s time to bring brutal officers to justice, even if that means a trial is difficult.   Mr. Yanez is one of several officers charged with crimes this year. Cutting to the chase, contact the Nobles County Attorney’s Office today and demand this officer be removed and investigated for assault. Prairie Justice Center 1530 Airport Rd. Suite 400 P.O. Box 337 Worthington, MN 56187 (507) 295-5298 (p) (507) 372-8439 (f) countyattorney@co.nobles.mn.us     Agent Joe Joswiak Assaults Driver Anthony Promvongsa was last modified: June 23rd, 2017 by Alex DeMarco